Scotland symbols

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Okay, those might not be official symbols or anything, but when you think Scotland, you surely think of bagpipes, plaid and Loch Ness, right? ๐Ÿ™‚ Well, on this card we have a piper with traditional plaid clothes, a highland cow, Urquhart Castle on Loch Ness (upper left corner), Loch Tay (between the cow and the piper), Melrose Abbey (the bottom left corner) and Glen Coe (bottom line, in the middle).

This card comes from Doyel. ๐Ÿ™‚

Urquhart Castle sits beside Loch Ness in the Highlands of Scotland. The present ruins date from the 13th to the 16th centuries, though built on the site of an early medieval fortification. Founded in the 13th century, Urquhart played a role in the Wars of Scottish Independence in the 14th century. The castle, situated on a headland overlooking Loch Ness, is one of the largest in Scotland in area.

St Mary’s Abbey, Melrose is a part ruined monastery of the Cistercian order in Melrose, Roxburghshire, in the Scottish Borders. It was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks on the request of King David I of Scotland, and was the chief house of that order in the country, until the Reformation. It was headed by the Abbot or Commendator of Melrose. Today the abbey is maintained by Historic Scotland. The abbey is known for its many carved decorative details, including likenesses of saints, dragons, gargoyles and plants. On one of the abbey’s stairways is an inscription by John Morow, a master mason, which says Be halde to ye hende (“Keep in mind, the end, your salvation”). This has become the motto of the town of Melrose.

 

 

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